We are the best in education

Our goal is better education for American students

What Can We Do

State governments set overall educational standards, often mandate standardized tests for K–12 public school systems and supervise, usually through a board of regents, state colleges, and universities.

And according to statistics we got this:

In 2013, about 87% of school-age children (those below higher education) attended state funded public schools

About 10% attended tuition- and foundation-funded private schools and roughly 3% were home-schooled.

Private schools are generally free to determine their own curriculum and staffing policies, with voluntary accreditation available through independent regional accreditation authorities, although some state regulation can apply.

The law

By state law, education is compulsory over an age range starting between five and eight and ending somewhere between ages sixteen and eighteen, depending on the state. This requirement can be satisfied in public schools, state-certified private schools, or an approved home school program. In most schools, compulsory education is divided into three levels: elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school. Children are usually divided by age groups into grades, ranging from kindergarten (5–6 year olds) and first grade for the youngest children, up to twelfth grade (17–18 years old) as the final year of high school.

 

There are also a large number and wide variety of publicly and privately administered institutions of higher education throughout the country. Post-secondary education, divided into college, as the first tertiary degree, and graduate school, is described in a separate section below. Higher education includes elite private colleges like Harvard University, Stanford University, MIT and Cal Tech, large state flagship universities, private liberal arts schools, historically-black colleges and universities, community colleges, and for-profit colleges like University of Phoenix. College enrollment has been declining since 2011 and student loan debt has risen to $1.5 trillion.

Spending

The United States spends more per student on education than any other country. In 2014, the Pearson/Economist Intelligence Unit rated US education as 14th best in the world. In 2015, the Programme for International Student Assessment rated U.S. high school students No. 40 globally in Math and No. 24 in Science and Reading. The President of the National Center on Education and the Economy said of the results “the United States cannot long operate a world-class economy if our workers are, as the OECD statistics show, among the worst-educated in the world”. Former U.S. Education Secretary John B. King, Jr. acknowledged the results in conceding U.S. students were well behind their peers. According to a report published by the U.S. News & World Report, of the top ten colleges and universities in the world, eight are American (the other two are Oxford and Cambridge, in the United Kingdom).

The US ranks 3rd from the bottom among OECD nations, in terms of is poverty gap and 4th from the bottom in terms of poverty rate. Jonathan Kozol has described these inequalities in K-12 education in Savage Inequalities and The Shame of a Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America.

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